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New Guidelines for the Sale of City-Owned Property

A resolution on this week’s City Council meeting agenda would adopt a newly drafted policy for the sale/disposition of City-owned property. The policy establishes guiding principles for which properties should be sold, a system of classifications for City-owned properties to determine which processes should be used to sell specific properties, and guiding principles for properties sold through direct negotiation.

Decisions on which properties to sell would be based on whether or not the properties meet City objectives. The City’s goals when it comes to property include private development of affordable housing, historic preservation, and increased density and improved walkability in support of the City’s Comprehensive Plan objectives.

Properties identified to be sold would be sold via one of three established processes: direct negotiation, request for proposal process, and bid sale to the highest bidder.

The document directs the City to classify its property into three tiers with differing objectives in order to guide the decision of which process to use for the sale of specific properties.

Tier one properties are those with the highest development value to the City, while tier two properties would be of slightly lower value, but still with significant neighborhood impacts.

The overall goals for the sale of tier one properties include return on investment through the generation of new tax revenue, generation of family wage jobs, spurring new private investment, and leveraging of existing public facilities while minimizing public liability, implementing City master plans, encouraging density, and promoting sustainability.

Overall goals for tier two properties are similar, but with the focus on supporting goals and strategies of the neighborhood councils and business districts by increasing affordable housing, improving walkability, safety, and overall quality of life and property values in the neighborhood, and increasing tax revenue for the City.

The sale of tier one and two properties would generally be dealt with through the RFP or direct negotiation process to give the City more control over the end use of these more valuable properties.

Tier three properties are those that are primarily of interest only to directly abutting properties or to other government entities. This third class of property would generally be disposed of through a highest bid process, with the ultimate goal of reducing City liability, returning underutilized properties to the tax rolls and private ownership, and encouraging improvement for the neighboring properties.


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Comments

fred davie

“The sale of tier one and two properties would generally be dealt with through the <span class=“caps”>RFP</span> or direct negotiation process to give the City more control over the end use of these more valuable properties. “

When the city places lots of conditions on the sale of a particular piece of surplus property they unwittingly lower the value of the property. Most buyers want to take title free of any encumbrances and restrictions. This ultimately hurts the taxpayers as the properties are going to generate lower sales prices. If property is genuinely “surplus” then it should be sold to the highest bidder as is.

August 20, 2012 at 10:35 pm / Reply / Quote and reply

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That Girl

I don’t think there’s anything “unwitting” about it.  And frankly, many of us taxpayers measure value in more than just dollar signs.

August 21, 2012 at 6:03 am / Reply / Quote and reply

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fred davie

“many of us taxpayers measure value in more than just dollar signs” that girl

Dollar signs are an easy way to measure values. It’s an objective measurement.

It’s pretty hard to measure “history” “affordability” “quality of life” and “sustainability.” These subjective qualities can’t be measured. They are code words which government officials can manipulate to sell or give away public property to their friends. It should be obvious that you can’t maximize <span class=“caps”>ROI</span>, nor can you increase tax revenue (objectives stated above)  by hobbling the sale of the properties with a bunch of ill defined conditions.

August 21, 2012 at 7:03 am / Reply / Quote and reply

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